ecancermedicalscience

Review

Role of nanotechnology and gene delivery systems in TRAIL based therapies

1 Aug 2016
George E Naoum, Fady Tawadros, Ammad Ahmad Farooqi, Muhammad Zahid Qureshi, Sobia Tabassum, Waleed Arafat, Donald J Buchsbaum

Since its identification as a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family, TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) has emerged as a new avenue in apoptosis-inducing cancer therapies. Its ability to circumvent the chemoresistance of conventional therapeutics and to interact with cancer stem cells (CSCs) self-renewal pathways, amplified its potential as a cancer apoptotic agent. Many recombinant preparations of this death ligand and monoclonal antibodies targeting its death receptors have been tested in monotherapy and combinational clinical trials. Gene therapy is a new approach for cancer treatment which implies viral or non-viral functional transgene induction of apoptosis in cancer cells or repair of the underlying genetic abnormality on a molecular level. The role of this approach in overcoming the traditional barriers of radiation and chemotherapeutics systemic toxicity, risk of recurrence, and metastasis made it a promising platform for cancer treatment. The recent first Food Drug Administration (FDA) approved oncolytic herpes virus for melanoma treatment brings forth the potency of the cancer gene therapy approach in the future. Many gene delivery systems have been studied for intratumoural TRAIL gene delivery alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents to produce synergistic cancer cytotoxicity. However, there still remain many obstacles to be conquered for this different gene delivery systems. Nanomedicine on the other hand offers a new frontier for clinical trials and biomedical research. The FDA approved nanodrugs motivates horizon exploration for other nanoscale designed particles’ implications in gene delivery. In this review we aim to highlight the molecular role of TRAIL in apoptosis and interaction with cancer stem cells (CSCs) self-renewal pathways. Finally, we also aim to discuss the different roles of gene delivery systems, mesenchymal cells, and nanotechnology designs in TRAIL gene delivery.

Related Articles

Marcello Moro Queiroz, Zenaide Silva de Souza, Aline Bobato Lara Gongora, Felipe de Galiza Barbosa, Carlos Alberto Buchpiguel, Marilia Germanos de Castro, Mariana Petaccia de Macedo, Rafael Ferreira Coelho, Ethan Samuel Sokol, Anamaria Aranha Camargo, Diogo Assed Bastos
Prasanth S Ariyannur, Reenu Anne Joy, Veena Menon, Roopa Rachel Paulose, Keechilat Pavithran, Damodaran M Vasudevan
Percy Torres-Quispe, Lissett Jeanette Fernández-Rodríguez, Yaowen Zhang, Angeles Rovirosa-Casino
Shridevi Subramaniam, Yek-Ching Kong, Hafizah Zaharah, Cuno SPM Uiterwaal, Andrea Richard, Nur Aishah Taib, Azura Deniel, Kok-Han Chee, Ros Suzanna Bustamam, Mee-Hoong See, Alan Fong, Cheng-Har Yip, Nirmala Bhoo-Pathy
Tapesh Bhattacharyya, Moses Arunsingh, Santam Chakraborty, Vishnu Harilal, Rohit Sasidharan, Saheli Saha, Robin Thambudorai, Bipradas Roy, Sudeep Banerjee, Paromita Roy, Soumendranath Ray, Indranil Mallick