Our website uses cookies to improve your on-site experience. By using the website, cookies are being used as described in our Policy Document
Warning: To log in you will need to enable cookies and reload the page (Policy Document)
My ePortfolio Register   
 

Abstract | Full HTML Article | PDF ecancer 10 631 / https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2016.631

Research

Singing modulates mood, stress, cortisol, cytokine and neuropeptide activity in cancer patients and carers

There is growing evidence that psychosocial interventions can have psychological benefits for people affected by cancer, including improved symptoms of mental health and wellbeing and optimised immune responses. However, despite growing numbers of music interventions, particularly singing, in cancer care, there is less research into their impact. We carried out a multicentre single-arm preliminary study to assess the impact of singing on mood, stress and immune response in three populations affected by cancer: carers (n = 72), bereaved carers (n = 66) and patients (n = 55). Participants were excluded if pregnant or if they were currently being treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or oral immunosuppressive drugs. Participants were regular participants in five choirs across South Wales and took part in one hour of group singing. Before and after singing, visual analogue mood scales, stress scales and saliva samples testing for cortisol, beta-endorphin, oxytocin and ten cytokines were taken. Across all five centres and in all four participant groups, singing was associated with significant reductions in negative affect and increases in positive affect (p < .01) alongside significant increases in cytokines including GM-CSF, IL17, IL2, IL4 and sIL-2rα (all p < .01). In addition, singing was associated with reductions in cortisol, beta-endorphin and oxytocin levels. This study provides preliminary evidence that singing improves mood state and modulates components of the immune system. Further work is needed to ascertain how this differs for more specific patient groups and whether repeat exposure could lead to meaningful, longitudinal effects.

Keywords: singing, cancer, cortisol, oxytocin, cytokine, beta-endorphin, inflammation, stress, mood, music

Loading Article Metrics ... Please wait

Author interviews

Daisy Fancourt

Centre for Performance Science, Royal College of Music, London, UK

Related videos

Related articles

Short Communication: Learning from the past to design better trials in second-line treatment for mesothelioma patients

Abstract | Full Article | PDF Published: 08 Nov 2018 / https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2018.881

Research: Information sources and online information seeking behaviours of cancer patients in Singapore

Abstract | Full Article | PDF Published: 31 Oct 2018 / https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2018.880

Clinical Study: High tumour burden, delayed diagnosis and history of cardiovascular disease may be associated with carcinoid heart disease

Abstract | Full Article | PDF Published: 25 Oct 2018 / https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2018.879

Research: Identifying barriers and finding solutions to implement best practices for cancer surgery at Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique

Abstract | Full Article | PDF Published: 23 Oct 2018 / https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2018.878

Conference Report: From science to real-life oncology—the ECCO 2018 European Cancer Summit, 7–9 September 2018, Vienna, Austria

Abstract | Full Article | PDF Published: 15 Oct 2018 / https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2018.877



Founding partners

European Cancer Organisation European Institute of Oncology

Founding Charities

Foundazione Umberto Veronesi Fondazione IEO Swiss Bridge

Published by

ecancer Global Foundation