Bispecific CAR T-cell therapy as treatment for hard to treat multiple myeloma

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Published: 7 Dec 2019
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Dr Yu Hu - Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China

Dr Yu Hu speaks to ecancer at the ASH 2019 meeting in Orlando about a study looking at the use of bispecific CAR T-cell therapy as treatment for hard to treat multiple myeloma.

Dr Hu explains that usually CAR T-cell therapies target one antigen but this new therapy can target two: Bcma and CD38.

He reports that the study demonstrated improved efficacy with a high overall response rate and also was effective in eliminating for extramedullary tumours.

ecancer's filming has been kindly supported by Amgen through the ecancer Global Foundation. ecancer is editorially independent and there is no influence over content.

Watch the press conference here

Read more about the study here

Mosunetuzumab induces complete remissions in poor prognosis non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Dr Yu Hu - Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China


We developed a very new CAR T-cell, that means dual target CAR T-cell. Before this usually a CAR T would just target one antigen but we at the same time target two antigens, that is the BCMA and the CD38. This will increase the ability to kill the cancer cell and do not increase the toxicity. We found that this new novel CAR T-cell is a very useful strategy to overcome multiple myeloma which retains or has low response to at least three other therapies. It’s very effective with OR [?] is 90% and the ASCR [?] is 54%.

At the same time it’s especially effective at eliminating the extramedullary tumour in multiple myeloma. This extramedullary tumour is usually poor to common therapies and patients who have this extramedullary tumour will have a poor outlook and a very bad quality of life. But in our clinical trial eight patients from nine had a partial or complete elimination of this extramedullary tumour.

At the same time we need to show this is powerful in killing the cancer cell and it doesn’t increase the toxicity of the patients, no neurotoxicity. The CRS is 90% but severe CRS is just five patients. So the adverse effects are manageable.
The next step, first we want to follow up the patients for at least two years and then we will conduct a phase II clinical trial both in China and other countries all over the world. We also want to design a randomised controlled clinical trial to compare different CAR T-cells or monoclonal antibodies to compare the safety and effectiveness.