CASSIOPEIA: Daratumumab plus D-VTd vs VTd in transplant-eligible NDMM

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Published: 6 Jun 2019
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Prof Philippe Moreau - University Hospital of Nantes, Nantes, France

Prof Philippe Moreau talks to ecancer at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting about the part 1 results from the CASSIOPEIA trial studying daratumumab plus bortezomib/thalidomide/dexamethasone (D-VTd) vs VTd in transplant-eligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM).

He explains that the primary endpoint of the study was to compare the quality of the response after consolidation and before maintenance while also looking at overall survival, progression free survival and the rate of minimal residual disease.

Prof Moreau reports a clear demonstration across 1000 randomised patients that the addition of daratumumab is increasing the quality of the response and also the minimal residual disease negativity rate which translates to an improved progression free survival.

ecancer's filming has been kindly supported by Amgen through the ecancer Global Foundation. ecancer is editorially independent and there is no influence over content.

We are going to present at ASCO 2019 the results of a phase III randomised study, the name of the study is CASSIOPEIA, dedicated to patients with multiple myeloma, front line treatment, young patients eligible for stem cell transplantation. It is a prospective comparison of bortezomib thalidomide and dexamethasone, the VTd regimen, followed by stem cell transplantation followed by VTd consolidation plus or minus daratumumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting CD38. The primary endpoint of the study was to compare the quality of the response, the stringent complete response rate, after consolidation and before maintenance. We also looked at progression free survival, overall survival and we looked also at the rate of minimal residual disease at the completion of consolidation and before maintenance.

So we are clearly demonstrating on a very large number of patients, more than 1,000 patients were randomised, that the addition of daratumumab is increasing the quality of the response, the depth of the response, the stringent CR rate but also the minimal residual disease negativity rate. This translates into a better progression free survival, so the number of patients dying or progressing from their disease is reduced with the addition of daratumumab.

This study probably will be a game changer because we are going to introduce systematically daratumumab in the setting of stem cell transplantation and potentially we will be able to cure some patients with the addition of high dose treatment.