My ePortfolio Register   

Novel DNA vaccine design improves chances of inducing anti-tumour immunity

Scientists have devised a novel DNA vaccine approach through molecular design to improve the immune responses elicited against one of the most important cancer antigen targets.

Study results were published in the journal Molecular Therapy.

Cancer immunotherapy approaches, designed to harness the body's natural immune defenses to target and kill cancer cells, are showing great promise for cancer treatment and prevention.

DNA vaccines can induce immunity through the delivery by an intramuscular injection of a sequence of synthetically designed DNA that contains the instructions for the immune cells in the body to become activated and target a specific antigen against which an immune response is sought.

This approach has proven effective in generating strong immunity against some infectious diseases as well as clearing neoplasia in patients with tumours caused by viral infection.

The recent identification of tumour-associated antigens, or proteins that are specifically expressed by tumour cells and not by normal cells, has sparked the development of DNA vaccine approaches against some of these promising targets.

Unfortunately, most vaccines targeting tumour-associated antigens have had limited success so far in producing therapeutic effects against most cancers due to poor immunogenicity.

Despite being specific for tumour cells, tumour-associated antigens typically trigger weak immune responses because they are recognised as self-antigens and the body has in place natural mechanisms of immune acceptance, or "tolerance", that prevent autoimmunity but also limit the efficacy of cancer vaccines.

This is the case of Wilm's tumor gene 1 (WT1), a tumour antigen that is overexpressed in many types of cancer and likely plays a key role in driving tumour development.

Vaccine approaches against WT1 so far have not appeared promising due to immune tolerance resulting in poor immune responses against cancers expressing WT1.

Wistar scientists have developed a novel WT1 DNA vaccine using a strategically modified DNA sequence that tags the WT1 as foreign to the host immune system breaking tolerance in animal models.

"This is an important time in the development of anti-cancer immune therapy approaches. This team has developed an approach that may play an important role in generating improved immunity to WT1 expressing cancers," said David B. Weiner, Ph.D., Executive Vice President and Director of the Vaccine Center at The Wistar Institute and the W.W. Smith Charitable Trust Professor in Cancer Research, and senior author of the study. "These immune responses represent a unique tool for potentially treating patients with multiple forms of cancer. Our vaccine also provides an opportunity to combine this approach with another immune therapy approach, checkpoint inhibitors, to maximise possible immune therapy impact on specific cancers."

The team lead by Weiner has optimised the DNA vaccine using a synthetic DNA sequence for WT1 that, while maintaining a very high homology with the native sequence, contains new changed sequences that differ from native WT1 in an effort to render it more recognisable by the host immune system.

This study shows that this novel vaccine design was able to induce WT1-specific, robust T cell responses as well as antibody production with no apparent toxicity both in mice and in non-human primates.

The novel WT1 vaccine was superior to a more traditional native WT1 vaccine because it was able to break immune tolerance and induce long term immune memory.

Importantly, the vaccine also stimulated a therapeutic anti-tumour response against leukaemia in mice.

Source: The Wistar Institute

0

Comments

Please click on the 'New Comment' link to the left to add a new comment, or alternatively click any 'Add Comment' link next to any existing post to respond. The views expressed here are not those of ecancer. For more information please view our Privacy Policy.



Founding partners

European Cancer Organisation European Institute of Oncology

Founding Charities

Foundazione Umberto Veronesi Fondazione IEO Swiss Bridge

Published by

Cancer Intelligence